Saturday, November 8, 2008

Washington Post: Mexican Odyssey review



The Washington Post wrote about the Post-Classical Ensemble:
...The real attractions of the program [were] more contemporary works for chamber ensemble. Mario Lavista's "Three Secular Dances" explored otherworldly sounds of the cello, performed ably by Evelyn Elsing with the sotto voce but frenetic shadowing of pianist Naoko Takao. Ana Lara's "Serenata" was a noise collision for 10 instruments.
Click on The Washington Post logo to read the full article (Saturday, November 8, 2008):

Washington Post logo

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Post-Classical's Scary Children's Concert: Carnival of Creatures

The Washington Post reports that the Post-Classical Ensemble will help the Strathmore with a performance called "Carnival of Creatures: A Scary Family Concert."

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Washington Post logo

P-CE helps Strathmore Celebrate with Carnival of Creatures

The Baltimore Sun reported that the Post-Classical Ensemble will help the Strathmore celebrate its silver anniversary with a performance called "Carnival of the Creatures" on October 26, 2008.

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Baltimore Sun logo

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

Carnival of the Creatures announced

The Baltimore Sun's Critical Mass blog announced the Post-Classical Ensemble's performance, "Carnival of the Creatures" at the Strathmore on October 26, 2008.

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Thursday, April 10, 2008

Financial Times: Post-Classical Ensemble Has "Verve"

The Financial Times reported "The performance under the conductor Angel Gil-Ordóñez had verve" when reviewing the P-CE's performance "Artists in Exile" at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Maryland.

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Monday, February 18, 2008

Washington Post: "Such Ardor"

The Washington Post reviewed "Free to Sing: The Story of the First African-American Opera Company."

The Post had this to say about the Post-Classical Ensemble:
It was also utterly charming, so lovingly cast and accompanied with such ardor by Angel Gil-Ordonez and the Post-Classical Ensemble that it would have taken a curmudgeon to resist its appeal.
Click on The Washington Post logo to read the full article (Monday, February 18, 2008; Page C01):

Washington Post logo

Baltimore Sun: Free to Sing "Thoroughly Persuasive, Classy"

The Baltimore Sun reviewed "Free to Sing: The Story of the First African-American Opera Company," saying, "It was a thoroughly persuasive, classy performance that paid fitting tribute to the forgotten Eichberg and the little-known ensemble of black singers that made its bold mark with his music more than a century ago."

The Sun had this to say about the Post-Classical Ensemble:
The orchestra of the Post-Classical Ensemble played with an admirable sheen. Conductor Angel Gil-Ordonez brought to the score delightful rhythmic flexibility and lyrical nuance.
Click the paper's logo below to read the full article:

Baltimore Sun logo

Washington Times: "Lively... Almost Mischievous"



The Washington Times reviewed "Free to Sing: The Story of the First African-American Opera Company," which featured the first performance of the operetta "The Doctor of Alcantara" in 100 years.

The Times said:
There was fine comic interplay and often superb singing ... But much of the evening's pleasure came from the Post-Classical Ensemble and its expressively kinetic conductor, Angel Gil-Ordonez, who turned in lively, detailed and almost mischievous playing, making this work seem as fresh as it must have more than a century ago — back in the first heady years of freedom.
Click on the Washington Times logo below to read the full article:

Friday, February 15, 2008

Free to Sing at Strathmore



The Carroll County Times reports on the upcoming performance "Free to Sing" at the Strathmore in Bethesda, MD, for which the Post-Classical Ensemble will be performing the score.

"It's one of the most interesting stories reflecting both Washington, D.C.'s and America's cultural heritage," the newspaper says. "It's also one of the most rarely told."

"Free to Sing" is the inspiring story of the Colored American Opera Company, the first black opera troupe in the United States. It includes a performance of Julius Eichberg's American operetta "The Doctor of Alcantara," as well as a recently discovered John Philip Sousa work.

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Thursday, February 14, 2008

Friday, February 1, 2008

Wednesday, January 30, 2008